Posts tagged attention & focus
How Your Smartphone is Making You Dumb and What to Do About It

Would you, could you put your phone away even just for a day?

Just in time for the National Day of Unplugging (celebrated on both March 9 and 10), author Catherine Price shares tips from her new book, How to Break Up With Your Phone: The 30-Day Plan to Take Back Your Life (Ten Speed Press).

If you’re like most people, your phone is within arm’s reach of you right this very second (that is, if you’re not reading this article on it to begin with), and the mere mention of it is making you want to check something. Like the news. Or your texts. Or your email. Or your Instagram feed. Or, really, anything at all.

Go ahead and do it. And then come back to this page and notice how you feel. Are you calm? Focused? Present? Satisfied? Or are you feeling a little scattered and uneasy, vaguely stressed without really knowing why?

Continue reading in Parade

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'Screen Time' is a Good Start to Curbing Our Smartphone Addiction, but Apple Needs to Do More

Screen Time, part of the operating system that iPhone owners began downloading last week, represents the biggest move yet by a technology company to encourage less use of a device, not more. That’s a good thing: According to data from a time-tracking app called Moment, Americans spend on average four hours a day — a quarter of our waking lives — staring at their smartphones.

Screen Time, which is new with Apple’s iOS 12, automatically tracks how often you pick up your phone and how much time you spend on each app. It also allows you to set daily limits for time-sucks like social media, games, or streaming video. It’s a good start, but Apple could do more. A huge number of people need help creating better digital boundaries.

Read on in the LA Times

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Putting Down Your Phone May Help You Live Longer

 [A]n increasing body of evidence suggests that the time we spend on our smartphones is interfering with our sleep, self-esteem, relationships, memory, attention spans, creativity, productivity and problem-solving and decision-making skills.

But there is another reason for us to rethink our relationships with our devices. By chronically raising levels of cortisol, the body’s main stress hormone, our phones may be threatening our health and shortening our lives.

Continue reading in the New York Times

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